Nausea! Feeling sick? This is what you can do

Nausea is just the worst. No matter who you are, there’s simply no cool way to do nausea. The warning signs are a queasy feeling in the stomach, and sudden flow of saliva (see, already uncool) 유희왕 한글판 다운로드. How can you make it stop, make it go away?

How do I treat nausea?

Treating nausea depends very much on the cause of your symptoms. If your nausea is not due to stomach infection, head injury or food poisoning, there are a few things you can do to help manage the queasy feeling:

  • Ask your chemist about anti-nausea medication. If you’re pregnant, don’t take anything without asking your doctor first!
  • Avoid caffeine. That means coffee, cola and strong Ceylon tea.
  • Avoid fatty or spicy foods
  • Eat small amounts of bland food to settle your stomach. Think here: rice, clear chicken soup, crackers or bananas.
  • Drink clear liquids often to stop dehydration.
  • Drink beverages that settle the stomach, such as ginger ale or chamomile tea

What causes nausea?

OK, partying way too much is one way to feel sick, but there are many other causes:

  • Concussion: If you’ve had a bad knock on the head and are suffering from concussion, nausea could be a symptom. Whether it’s caused by vision disturbance, hormone release or just your body trying to keep you awake, you may feel sick.
  • Migraine: During a migraine headache, arteries in the temporal area of your head widen, sending signals to your brain, and causing pain! This puts your body into “fight or flight” response: it speeds up your heart rate and slows down your digestive system – which can cause nausea.
  • Brain Infections: infections like meningitis (infection around the brain) lead to nausea as a symptom.
  • Ear: Your inner ear sends signals to your brain to tell it if you’re upright. If your brain is getting different signals from your eyes than from your inner ear, it gets confused, and you feel nauseous. An example? Think about trying to read in a car, or taking a boat trip on a stormy sea: your eye is fixed on something still, but your inner ear canal knows that you’re moving! This can also happen if you have an inner-ear infection.
  • Blood sugar: People with diabetes can also develop nausea if their blood sugar levels are too high or low (hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia). This is because their sugar and insulin balance is disturbed. If you often feel nausea when you haven’t eaten, you might want to see your doctor for a check-up.
  • Stomach Infection: Viral or bacterial infections can cause nausea – like gastro.
  • Spoiled food: When your body recognises the food is off, it makes every effort to get rid of it, and it should: it prevents you from getting dangerously sick.
  • Too much alcohol: In large amounts, alcohol is also a toxin, and your body will take steps to get rid of it.
  • Shock: Nausea can also be a brain reaction triggered by pain, deep emotional distress or as a reaction to horrible sights or smells – a gut-reaction, if you like.
  • Pregnancy. Doctors believe that nausea during pregnancy is your body’s reaction to the pregnancy hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG).
  • Medicine: Some medications can have nausea as a side-effect, and so can anaesthetics used in operations.
Read  10 home remedies for common symptoms

Note: If the nausea carries on for longer than three days, it’s time to see the doctor. Also, if you’ve had a head injury, you’re vomiting blood or have a stiff neck – see the doctor now

Nausea happens to everybody

When it comes to level playing fields, nausea is no respecter of persons. Whether you’re a top business executive or a toddler, if your stomach needs to expel something, you are no longer in control. Think about it for a minute; everything in your digestive tract is geared to move in a certain direction: down. You don’t even have to think about it – whether you’re asleep or awake those muscles are doing their job. But, if you’ve eaten something bad, the whole process does a turn-about and all systems work together to get rid of whatever it is. Your body is amazing!

Source: Drugs.com