Tag

nausea

Symptoms, Aches & Pains
July 16, 2018

Nauseous after eating? Here’s why

You’ve just finished a delicious meal and while it’s hit the spot, you’re starting to feel sick. Urgh. Why are you feeling nauseous? Your digestive system is a collection of organs that work together to break down what you eat or drink. When you eat, the food is digested and the nutrients are turned into energy. The process begins in your mouth when you chew and the food is broken down to be swallowed. Food travels down your food pipe and then to the stomach and intestines. Any problems during these processes may cause nausea after eating. Food poisoning If…
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Gut & digestion
December 8, 2017

Relief for irritable bowel syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic disorder of the digestive system. You may have abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhoea, or both. People who suffer from this disorder have a heightened sensitivity of the gut. More common in women, IBS causes spasms in the colon; with pain and wind in the stomach too. Causes for IBS Your digestive system has rhythmic muscular contractions. When these become irregular, it interferes with the normal movement of food and waste; which results in a build-up of mucus and toxins. This process is not due to a single disease-process, though. According to research from the…
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Liver & Gallbladder
December 8, 2017

Is your gallbladder acting up?

You have a nagging pain in your stomach. It might be gas, it could be a pulled muscle, or the after-effects of last night’s dodgy pizza. Or… it might be your gallbladder. If this sounds like a tiny, unimportant little organ you’ve never heard of before, you’re half-right. The problem though, is that, if your gallbladder does act up, you could land in hospital, or worse. When things go pear-shaped Your gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ, tucked under the liver. The job of the gallbladder is to store bile, a substance that helps you digest fat and fat-soluble vitamins and…
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Gut & digestion
October 27, 2017

How to find out if you have ulcers

How easy is it to get an ulcer? Do they just affect older people? Well, the answers are ‘easier than you think’, and ‘no’, but let’s look at the details. What are ulcers? Basically, an ulcer is an open wound. The most common kind are peptic ulcers which form in the stomach or the upper part of the small intestine. What causes ulcers? Previously, people used to believe that ulcers were caused by spicy food, alcohol or stress. Today we know that most peptic ulcers are caused by: 1. A certain group of bacteria. H. pylori is a group of…
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Ears, Nose & Throat
October 24, 2017

What to do when the world is spinning

If you also used to play on the merry-go-round, or spin yourself around when you were young, you would have felt that the world kept on spinning. This sensation is called vertigo, and it's all fun and games when you're 9 years old, but if the symptom doesn't go away, it can be awful. What is vertigo exactly? Vertigo is a symptom, rather than a condition. It's the sensation that you, or the environment around you, is moving or spinning even though you are standing still. In some cases, this feeling may be barely noticeable, but in others in can…
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Symptoms, Aches & Pains
May 23, 2017

Why do I get motion sickness?

Have you ever been in a bus and felt dizzy for no reason? Say “hello” to the common traveller’s companion: motion sickness. Motion sickness simply means: a disturbance in your body’s sense of balance and equilibrium. Any mode of transport can cause motion sickness. What happens is your brain and body become confused and go into malfunction mode. What’s with the motion? You can feel motion sickness in a car, train, boat, an aeroplane, or even on a rollercoaster. The sickness usually goes away when the motion stops. Children between the ages of five and 12 who would usually be…
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Healthy LifestyleTravel & holiday
May 17, 2017

How to avoid getting sick while traveling

Love to travel, but afraid you may get sick en route? Don’t be. Enjoy the journey with these tips. Taking the train Sit face forward. When you’re seated against the direction of travel, you could have motion sickness. Motion sickness is when one part of your balance-sensing system (your inner ear, eyes, and sensory nerves) sense that your body is moving, but the other parts don't. This can cause you to feel dizzy or nauseous. If all the forward-facing seats are taken, ask someone to swap with you. You can also ask the train conductor for help. Look ahead. Try…
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Gut & digestion
December 27, 2015

Nausea! Feeling sick? This is what you can do

Nausea is just the worst. No matter who you are, there’s simply no cool way to do nausea. The warning signs are a queasy feeling in the stomach, and sudden flow of saliva (see, already uncool). How can you make it stop, make it go away? (more…)
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